Essentials For A Well Stocked Sales Kit

Whether your ideal clients are large or small, consumers or businesses, a lasting impression is required to seal the deal. While you may think a Word doc printed on the company copier is a great tool for your sales team to use – think again. An equipped salesperson needs the added credibility of a professional looking company; quite frankly, a Word document won’t give them an edge.

 

Let’s look at it from another angle. How likely would you be to hire a candidate who didn’t wear a pressed suit or outfit to an interview, and then handed you a wrinkled resume to review? Of course, it’s highly unlikely they’d get the job.

 

A well-stocked sales kit is your company’s interview attire. It allows your salesperson to put their best foot forward.

 

Here’s what you need to button up your sales team before you even send them out.

 

Business Card – This is most essential component. It’s your salesperson’s best asset. Get business cards before you do anything else. Make sure to include all forms of contact – including all social media information.

Pocket Folder – Busy people often lose things. Make it easy for your clients to find all the information they need to know about you with a pocket folder.

Brochure – Repeat after me: I will not use Microsoft Word to create my brochure. A graphic designer will create a custom and unique brochure with room for a bio, list of products/services offered, contact info and anything else that’s important to you. Have it professionally printed. You’ll likely get more results if you take time to present your customers an informative and visually appealing representation of your company.

Case Studies – These go in your pocket folder, with your brochure. They are the evidence behind everything the salesperson is saying and are a useful reference during a meeting if there are specific questions. A client list may also be included.

Product Sell Sheets – Perfect to shed more light on your specific product offerings, inserts can be, well, inserted based on which products your client might be interested in. That is, they make it easy to give them the necessary information, but give you the flexibility to choose which products to spend time discussing. This way, there’s less of an overwhelming amount of information and more discussion.

Your Story – Connecting to your client is key to effective communication. Include the history behind your business, where the idea came from, or interesting details that make your story personal, relatable, and honest. This will help with helping your client feel more connected to you and your company.

 


 

LJF Marketing has in-house design capabilities and printing options, so please contact us if you’re interested in tailoring any of the above sales collateral to your company’s unique vision.

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Eat Even More Ice Cream Using LinkedIn

We haven’t talked much about LinkedIn; however, it can be crucial to your business’ success and your professional life in general. We’ve outlined some thoughts to reach out to others on LinkedIn. With enough time and persistence, showing a genuine interest in your network connections will give you the opportunity to ‘grab ice cream’ with them.

Follow up every couple of months or when something major happens with your connections:

  • Especially with people you don’t see very often, it is nice to hear that people are thinking of you every couple of months. It will make it more likely that when the opportunity does arise for you to work together, things will work out, because you don’t simply come to them when you have a problem or need something.

Recommend someone:

  • LinkedIn has a tool, called “endorsements”, where you can endorse the skills listed on a contact’s profile with just a click. It takes just a little of your time, but will pay dividends – because who doesn’t like someone who says something nice about them?

Be active in groups:

  • You’re in a group, so why don’t you stay active? It’s definitely good to be a part of some larger groups, but exercise moderation and join some smaller groups so you can actively form relationships with the group members.

Reach out to people who have viewed your profile:

  • Use discretion on this one. If you have never met the person, this is probably not a wise thing to do. However, if you met this person recently, or have met them multiple times, then it’s probably a good idea to send them a note and try to connect.

Pass along leads:

  • If you see that someone in a related field is looking for a job and know of an opening at your company (or elsewhere) that they are qualified for, it wouldn’t hurt to send them the link to the posting. Even if that’s not the job they end up with, your contact will remember you when the tables have been turned or when they discover a new business opportunity . . . they will think of you.

Remember: LinkedIn is NOT Facebook or Twitter. Your network is made of professional contacts, so always exercise caution in what you say. You can be somewhat casual, but refrain from making any tasteless jokes or anything you would not want to get out in the public.

The Art of the (virtual) Elevator Speech

An elevator speech at networking events is a key part of managing your message and spreading it to others. While this concept is no less important in the realm of social media, may seem difficult to translate it to such a platform. We’re here to answer your questions to make the process seamless.

 

Q: Where do I put my elevator speech?

  • A: The “About” section

On Twitter, this would be your profile. The About section may be found in different places on each profile (on LinkedIn, it’s under the “Home” section), but it’s typically the first thing potential customers look for.

  • Make sure your about section is visible to everyone. You can change this in your privacy settings. That way, people that don’t already like your page can get the information from a general search.

Q: What needs to be in it?

  • A: What your business does
  • Who it serves
  • How it serves
  • Why it serves
  • Note: This content is different from a sales pitch. You haven’t won that key meeting yet, so this is an opportunity to get someone interested in hearing your pitch.

Q: How long does it need to be?

  • A: Relatively short (I recommend 6-7 sentences)
    Sum up the previous 3 questions succinctly and with a concrete example or two. These sentences can be divided into short paragraphs for emphasis, if that’s your writing style. Similar to resume writing, you must get the point across quickly because you don’t have a lot of time to impress the reader. Give them enough to get them interested, but don’t waste time and energy giving everything away; peak their interest and they will come to you.

Q: How do I end it?

  • A: Tell the reader to contact your company today for more information, or lead them to your website.
  • Note: Make sure you leave all contact information. If someone has read this far, you would normally give them your business card; this essentially emulates that act.

 

Pressed for time? LJF Marketing does all of this in house, so contact us for more information. Until then, we hope this helps!

Social Media Demographics: Who’s Using Which Sites?

In our last post, we challenged you to use demographics to target your market on social media. If you’re still puzzled on where to find general statistics to see where to use your social media sites, look no further – we’ve found the missing piece. Here is an infographic on the market segmentation of different social media websites.

Social Media Demographics: Who’s Using Which Sites?
Source: Flowtown – Social Media Marketing Application

Now that you have a way to figure out and understand your market, stay tuned for more tips on how to actually implement a strategy.

A Lesson in Collateral Consistency in the Digital Age

We are excited to bring you the first entry on our blog! We hope you will find this to be an awesome resource for all of your questions about business on the web, so, today, we’re kicking things off with some ideas to help you improve your web collateral.

While you may understand the importance of collateral (brochures, promotional items, etc.) in spreading your business’s name, you might need some help developing that when it comes to the web. The real challenge in this case lies within using different media to communicate. Here are a few collateral ideas that will spread your message in a less conventional manner than the standard logo-infused brochure.

Infographics

Infographics are a way of visualizing information and statistics in a condensed format. What makes them great is that they appeal to many different types of learners; Some people are visual learners, whereas some learn by reading. They can also be shared by users on outlets like Pinterest, Tumblr, and BuzzFeed, so you don’t have to hand it to someone in person for your message to be heard. No matter where it is shared, it will always be branded with your logo, so viewers will be directed back to your company.
Exhibit A: This Honda Accord Infographic

Image


Kickstarter

Kickstarter is a funding platform for creative initiatives. Essentially, it is a social way of getting people involved with your new project. The way it works is that you set a deadline for when you want to raise a certain amount of money. Then, you try to get people to back you, for some kind of reward in return (a service you will provide, etc.). If you do not meet your monetary goal, none of your backers are charged. There are certain specifications to which types of projects qualify, but if you are trying to get your business off of the ground, this is a great avenue to display what your brand is all about. With Kickstarter, customers actually get to see the quality of your work.

Instagram

Instagram is a useful tool for sharing pictures of what you actually do with your company. Contrary to what some may think, you don’t have to be artsy or a professional photographer for it to be effective. It can be useful just to post pictures of you and some co-workers at a company-sponsored event to Facebook and Twitter all at once. For that reason, Instagram is a great idea to help make your brand more consistent, without having to deal with the logistics of creating a new banner (Instagram profiles are not customizable).

Have you ever tried other unconventional media that were successful?